Tag Archives: Short Story competitions

Bath Short Story Award 2018

Our fifth international short story award is now open for entries from:

November 1st 2017 – April 23rd 2018 (midnight BST).

This year we are happy to welcome back Euan Thorneycroft, senior literary agent from A M Heath who also judged our 2017 award. He will select the winning and commended stories from the short list.

For the 2018 Award, we have increased the prizes to:

£1200 first prize

£300 second prize

£100 third prize

£100 for the Acorn Award (for an unpublished writer)

and as usual, £50 in vouchers for the local prize generously donated by Mr B’s Emporium of Books, Bath.

Entry fee £8 per story.

Please remember to check our rules before entering here.

We look forward to reading your stories!

Finding the right title

How do you create a good title? So much has been written about this. Good ones stay with you for ever. I love Raymond Carver’s famous short story title, which is also the title of one of his collections,  “What we talk about when we talk about love.” Gordon Lish, his editor, retitled it  “I Am Going to Sit Down.” but thankfully,  it  was never published in that version.

There’s a fun thing I saw recently somewhere online, which suggested writing  bad versions of famous titles of novels and short stories. For example, ‘The Grapes of Wrath’ could be ‘The Fruits of Anger’. Worse, another Steinbeck novel. ‘Of Mice and Men’ could be translated into  ‘Of Rodents and Males.”What about ‘Offspring and Their Romantic Partners’? Or ‘Fondness in the Season of the Plague’. Silly, but useful to study the originals and see how they work. Is it the weight of the words, or what they encompass about the book. Is it the rhythm or the length of the title?

Some of the most used titles for short stories are ‘The Gift’, ‘Dust’, ‘Flight’.”Lost and Found’, ‘Memories’, ‘Skin.’ We have had several entries with these titles at Bath Short Story Award. One year we had two stories on the short list titled ‘Flight’. They were good stories, but different titles could have reflected something else in the piece and may have made them even stronger.

Maybe the words in the picture on this post  could inspire a short story. Or a title?

So before you send in your entry, check your title. Does it enhance your story? Could you extend or contract it? Is it a cliche or overused? Have fun making title revisions. And remember, we close in two weeks on 1st May.

BSSA team member, Jude, April 2017.