News

Longlist, Bath Short Story Award 2019

Many congratulations to all the writers who have been selected for the longlist of the 2019 international Bath Short Story Award. We received 1493 entries this year and thank you to all the world wide writers who entered. If the title to your story is on this list, please first check your emails. Sometimes, title names are duplicated among the entries and all longlisted writers will receive an email from us today confirming that they are on the list (18th June). Let us know if your title is here and you have not received an email. Judging is still in progress and all entries are judged blind. While you are welcome to share the news you are on this list on social media or elsewhere, please do not identify your story title with your name. Thank you. The short list of twenty titles will be announced in two weeks time.

2019 Bath Short Story Award Long List
Title Author
5 Things I Can See tba
A Drinker’s Face tba
A Gap Shaped Like The Missing tba
A Little Cloud tba
At The Very Top Of The World tba
Beautiful Things tba
Because We Are Weak tba
Bellissima tba
Blue Reflective tba
Boxing Like Butterflies tba
Breast Plucker tba
Candie Klosse, Chuckie, Wolf And Me tba
Circling The Chicken tba
Even The Silence tba
Every Ninety Seconds tba
Everybody Wants Baby Girls tba
Everything But The Squeal tba
Exposure tba
Face It tba
Fish Face tba
For A Patient tba
For Some Time Now tba
Goya In The Deaf Man’s House tba
Grandmas Perfume tba
How tba
Hungry Roads tba
I Just Like Visiting Museums tba
I Told You So tba
In The Name Of tba
Indian Summer tba
It’s A Trap tba
Joyriders tba
Jungle tba
Kirabiti tba
Legacy tba
Les Nuits D’été tba
Limbo tba
Meet Me At The Rendezvous Café tba
Mrs Da Costa Takes It For The Team tba
Murmuration tba
Nevermind tba
October 1961 tba
Of Salt And The Raw Flesh Of Fish tba
Only Connect tba
Opening Night tba
Picking Through The Bones tba
Pockets tba
Sadness tba
Said The Monster tba
Salacia tba
Saver Girl tba
Secrets tba
Side Order tba
Silent Witness tba
Silver Foil tba
Slip In Time tba
Snowdrops tba
Strawberry Picking tba
The Armchairs tba
The Barrier tba
The Butcher Of Bakewell tba
The Cubby House tba
The Electric Historian tba
The Hunting Of The Masu’wa tba
The Jaws Of The Wolf tba
The Jinn tba
The Listening Grandmothers tba
The Orchard tba
The Priest’s Daughter tba
The Road Trip tba
The Stepwell tba
The Sweet Business tba
The Untelling Of Suzie Mckellar tba
Tina tba
To The Sea tba
Trust Fall tba
Underneath The Lightning Tree tba
Up In The Air – A Story Of Snot And Grazed Knees tba
Water And Oil tba
What Next tba

Last Minute Writing Tweaks

Time is running out now. There’s just over one week before our 2019 Award ends on Monday,15th April. Results out in late July.
We’re a fan of the obvious. Often the seasoned writer knows all about what’s on the list below but still neglects one or two aspects of final edits. Continue reading

Interview with Anthony Doerr

Jude interviewed Anthony Doerr in March 2013 and we’re re-posting his interview here for 2019 entrants to read. He’s written some great tips on writing short stories which could help with final edits before you submit your stories (by 15th April) and we highly recommend reading his extraordinary story collection Memory Wall and his wonderful Pullitzer prize-winning novel, All the Light We Cannot See which is soon to be released as a Netflix movie. Continue reading

Interview with Danielle McLaughlin

Danielle McLaughlin

In honour of her wonderful and well-deserved success, and for a further celebration of the short story as a form, we are re-posting Jude’s interview from 2016 with Irish Writer Danielle McLaughlin who has just won the 2019 Windham Campbell prize for fiction, quote here from the Irish Examiner:
“From Donoughmore, Co Cork and UCC’s writer-in-residence, Ms McLaughlin is the third Irish writer in four years to win the Windham-Campbell Prize worth €146,000.
Her debut short story collection, Dinosaurs on Other Planets published in 2015 just a few years after she had to give up practising law following ill-health, was selected.
It was cited by judges for stories that “capture the beauty and brutality of human relationships, imbuing them with near-magical qualities rooted in the details of everyday life in a manner both wry and resonant”. Continue reading

Is your short story the length it needs to be?

Are you writing a short story for our next award? There are just under five weeks to go until the closing date of 15th April. Sometimes writers entering competitions think that if there is a word limit, they need to write to the absolute maximum word count permitted. For our Award, that’s 2200 words. But you don’t need to write up to this line. There is no lower limit, which means you could write in the short-short form (flash fiction) and still be considered.

Very short stories (500 words or fewer) are few among our submissions and our sister competition Bath Flash Fiction Award is the best place to submit micros (300 words and under) but stories far less than 2200 words have been selected for the BSSA short list and have been published in the winners’ anthology. For example, Ingrid Jendrzejewski’s marvellous story, ‘We Were Curious About Boys’, in the 2016 anthology is around 1500 words. You can buy our 2015, 2016 and 2017 anthologies from this website in hard copy and our 2018 anthology from our publisher’s website to see the variety in the lengths of stories. All the anthologies are available in digital versions from Kindle or Nook. Continue reading

What could you write about for BSSA 2019?

Bath Short Story Award team member, Jude, who also organises Bath Flash Fiction Award and Flash Fiction Festivals UK, recently asked the judge of the latest Bath Flash Award, Christopher Allen, who co-edits the long-established flash fiction magazine, Smokelong Quarterly, what themes were under-represented among the hundreds of submissions they receive each week. He chose to answer this by citing themes that are over-represented. These included End-Of-The-World stories, animal metaphors and stories about the death of children. In our Award, we certainly receive a lot those themes and we’d add to that the very many stories about relationship break-ups and dementia. As Christopher says, humour is often under-represented. And we agree it’s amazing to read a story that can combine humour with poignancy. Continue reading

Latest Anthology Author News 2019

So much has been happening for some of the incredibly talented short story writers who have won or been shortlisted in our Awards over the past few years and are published in our yearly anthologies. Congratulations first to Caroline Ward Vine, whose short story Unravelling was short-listed in BSSA 2018 and is published in the 2018 anthology. Caroline won the Costa Short Story Award this January for her story Breathing Water and she also reached the short list of ten for the Mslexia short story competition with another story. Continue reading

Bath Short Story Award 2018 Anthology Launch

On 5th December, Jude, Jane and Anna from the BSSA team welcomed six authors and over forty guests to Mr B’s Emporium of Books, Bath for the launch of the 2018 anthology of stories from the Bath Short Story Award. This is the sixth anthology we have published, this time, with our new publisher, Ad Hoc Fiction, who also publishes the anthologies for Bath Flash Fiction Award. For the cover design, we’re very pleased to be able to continue using the beautiful collage painting of a building in The Circus Bath, made by artist and writer Elinor Nash who has designed all our book covers since she won the BSSA Award in 2014. This year, the book cover has a background colour which we call ‘sunrise pink’. For the launch, we bought a cake printed with this design and Elinor said it was a first to see one of her designs in icing.

    Our six authors with stories in the anthology, who travelled from all over the UK to be with us, were Hilary Taylor, who won third prize with her short story, Sea Defences, Chloe Turner, who won the local prize with Witches Sail in Eggshells, Sandra Marslund, commended for The Other Couple, James Mitchell shortlisted for Pairing, Tamara Pollock shortlisted with The Plates of Strangers and Caroline Ward-Vine shortlisted for Unravelling. You can read these and the rest of the twenty marvellous stories in the anthology which is available from the Ad Hoc Fiction bookshop in several different currencies for posting worldwide and also on Kindle and Nook. Local readers can also buy the book at Mr B’s.

Interview with Samuel Hodder, 2019 Judge

We’re delighted that literary agent with Blake Friedmann, Samuel Hodder, has agreed to be our judge for the Bath Short Story Award 2019. Samuel graduated in Psychology from University of Warwick, and completed a Masters in Publishing, before working for several years as an editor for psychology research. In 2015 he joined Blake Friedmann in the Contracts and Finance departments and is building his own list of authors.

In literary and contemporary fiction he loves distinctive voices and complex characters (e.g. Eileen by Ottessa Moshfegh), coming-of-age novels, LGBTQI themes, and novels that explore the loss of innocence, desire, deceit, class, or the world of work. In historical fiction, novels so immersive they can show readers a different way of thinking and being: Mary Renault’s novels are favourites. In crime and thrillers, he loves an unusual, evocative setting (e.g. The Axeman’s Jazz by Ray Celestin), but would like to read anything from psychological suspense to the truly macabre.

He also welcomes dystopian and speculative fiction, including fantasy, science-fiction, and the supernatural, where he would like to see novels centred on the characters’ psychological journeys (e.g. the Earthsea novels by Ursula K Le Guin, The Southern Reach Trilogy by Jeff VanderMeer, or The Loney by Andrew Michael Hurley), but he likes huge, world-building novels too (e.g. Consider Phlebas by Iain M Banks or Children of Time by Adrian Tchaikovsky).

Interview

  • You are currently building your author list at Blake Friedmann and you are looking for a wide variety of fiction, including coming-of -age novels, LGBTQI themes – novels that can immerse readers into a different way of thinking with unusual and evocative settings. I imagine this is what you might be looking for in short story entries as well?
    Yes, in short! Stories in all genres – contemporary, historical, a thriller, even SFF – and all settings in time and place will be welcome by me. I am passionate about LGBT fiction, so a story with LGBT themes or characters would be very exciting. I recognise that a richly evocative setting is hard to accomplish within 2,200 words, but if you are able to transport me to another world within these constraints, I’ll be hugely impressed.
  • Your background is in psychology, and you are also interested in dystopian and speculative fiction including fantasy and science fiction, novels centred on characters’ psychological journeys. Can you say a little more about this?

I think that what drew me into psychology – first at university and then as an editor for psychology research – was the same instinct that later drew me back to literature: a desire to learn more about myself and others, to understand life better, ultimately to seek comfort on this rollercoaster ride that is “the human condition.” The openness of science-fiction and fantasy, where the only limit to the story and its world is the author’s imagination, can be a wonderful space to take the reader on unique psychological journeys. I think this is part of Tolkien’s huge and enduring appeal, and I’m an enormous fan of Ursula K Le Guin’s Earthsea novels (which draw on Taoist philosophy, as Ged journeys towards a Taoist way of life) and the chilling, weird, uncanny Southern Reach trilogy by Jeff VanderMeer.

  • Do you see a future in the world of digital publishing at the moment, or do you think hard copy books are still the favoured way into publishing?
    Certainly there is a future in the world of digital publishing. A few years ago, many commentators predicted that the rise ebooks would marginalise print books. It’s now clear that isn’t happening – ebooks have actually lost a little market share, as sales of print books have risen. However, ebooks remain very important, and publishing is now firmly a multi-format venture, with print books, ebooks and audio books all reaching large numbers of readers and providing crucial income to authors. Some ‘digital first’ publishers are doing great work right now – especially in commercial fiction – in reaching new readers and bringing new life to backlist titles. At Blake Friedmann we’ve seen books first published 30 years ago soar up the bestseller charts this year after being republished as ebooks and brought to a new generation of readers.
  • At the moment, as well as novels and non-fiction, would you accept submissions of short story collections, stories in a linked sequence, or novellas, which seem to be becoming more popular?
    Yes to all the above. It isn’t easy to convince a publisher to invest in a short story collection by a debut author, but it can be done – if the writing is outstanding – and many publishers are providing more space to short story collections today than just a few years ago. So please do submit them to me. Some of my favourite books of all time are novellas – from Death in Venice to Heart of Darkness to The Metamorphosis – so I welcome novellas as well. Booksellers have given more space to these lately, and publishers have produced innovative series in both short fiction and non-fiction. I love the Vintage Minis series by Penguin Books, to give one example.
  • Which short story writers do you particularly like?
    Any list of my all-time favourites must include Shirley Jackson. I adore her gloriously unsettling short stories, her gift for rendering the everyday sinister or uncanny. Start with the Dark Tales collection, if you’ve not read her before. Another favourite short story writer is John Cheever. I admire the pathos of his clever, quietly tragic stories, which are immediately transporting to the particular world of American post-war suburbia, yet still speak movingly today to readers who have never known it. Among contemporary writers, I loved Kevin Barry’s collection Dark Lies the Island – his linguistic agility, comedic timing, and startling voices, the alternating shades of levity and darkness. Ottessa Moshfegh is another favourite, the stories in Homesick for Another World are incredibly confident and controlled, her characters so often appalling but at the same time irresistible.
  • What would be the ingredients of a stand-out short story entry for you?

I enjoy tension in short stories and being unnerved. I love a sharply distinctive voice and characters that are badly behaved and not sorry for it. My taste in humour can be jet-black. But I’m prepared to be completely surprised, and to fall in love with a story that is completely different to my usual tastes – even something gentle or romantic!

Special Book Sale — 2015, 2016, 2017 BSSA anthologies.

Christmas presents for your short story loving parent, grandparent, sibling, husband, wife, partner, uncle, aunt, friend or lover. Our 2015, 2016 and 2017 Anthologies are all for sale for only £5.00 each including postage and packing, to UK residents. Stocks limited so buy soon.
Read excellent stories on many different subjects by writers from all over the world in each of these volumes: Buy here:
Writers in the 2015 anthology:  Safia Moore, Dan Powell, Angela Readman, KM Elkes, Lucy Corkhill, Eileen Merriman, Barbara Weeks, Sarah Collins, Emma Seaman, Emily Devane, Anne Corlett, Anna Metcalfe, Alice Falconer, Adam Kucharksi, Fran Landsman, Fiona Mitchell, Debbi Voisey, Chris Edwards-Pritchard, John Holland Continue reading